Emergency Department Pediatric Performance Measures Toolbox

Assessing the quality of medical care and identifying opportunities for improvement of care is an important responsibility of medical professionals, as well as all health care facilities. Though children account for 20% of emergency care visits nationally, few measures have been defined for assessing the emergency care of pediatric patients. This toolbox features the work of Evaline Alessandrini, MD, and her EMSC Targeted Issues project "Defining Quality Performance Measures for Pediatric Emergency Care." Her project seeks to improve pediatric emergency care through the consensus identification of pediatric emergency care performance measures and associated elements of documentation.  Providing a framework for the measurement of pediatric emergency care will facilitate national benchmarking as well as an opportunity for development of risk adjustment processes to facilitate better pediatric emergency care research.
HEALTHCARE PROVIDER RESOURCES

Emergency Department Pediatric Performance Measures

  • Subdivided in to the following 11 areas of interest, the 60 performance measures comprehensively reflect hospital-based pediatric emergency care.More details about these measures... 
DESCRIPTION OF TARGETED ISSUE GRANT

Background Information

  • “Defining Quality Performance Measures for Pediatric Emergency Care” is funded by a Targeted Issues Grant from the Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) program and is in response to “Emergency Care for Children: Growing Pains,” the 2006 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report that recommends the development of national standards for emergency care performance measurement.More details about this grant...
DATABASE SEARCHESEXAMPLE PRACTICES: MODEL PROGRAMS

Mchcom.com Webcast: Using Performance Measures to Drive Improvement in Pediatric Emergency Care

  • This webcast highlights three examples of how measures have been used to improve pediatric emergency care. Specifically, it addresses pain assessment and management (the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin); effective treatment of pediatric asthma exacerbations (the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia); and timely antibiotic administration for children with fever, neutropenia, and central lines (the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) More details about this and other example practices

HEALTHCARE PROVIDER RESOURCES
  • Fifteen Priority Emergency Department Performance Measures. Each of the 60 measures were assessed for 1) importance to emergency medical services for children, 2) scientific acceptability, 3) usability, and 4) feasibility by a diverse stakeholder group that included pediatric emergency medicine physicians, general emergency medicine physicians practicing in academic or community settings, nurses, and parents. Using these ratings, the working group prioritized 15 measures for testing and improvement.


DESCRIPTION OF TARGETED ISSUE GRANT

EXAMPLE PRACTICES
  • Mchcom.com Webinar: Using Performance Measures to Drive Improvement in Pediatric Emergency Care. (slides | transcript) To address serious shortcomings related to pediatric emergency care (PEC), the "Emergency Care for Children: Growing Pains" component of the Institute of Medicine report recommends the development of national standards for emergency care performance measurement. This webinar addressed the following essential issues: 
    • The importance and relevance of performance measurement in pediatric emergency care 
    • Use of a consensus development process to define a balanced report card for pediatric emergency care 
    • Integration of performance measurement into the electronic medical record 
    • Examples of how measures have been used to improve pediatric emergency care 
    • Pain assessment and management - the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin 
    • Effective treatment of pediatric asthma exacerbations - the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia 
    • Timely antibiotic administration for children with fever, neutropenia and central lines - Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center